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Andy Rolfe takes a more old-fashioned approach to shooting a Freestyle session…

MattGaydonSelfieThese days you can retake your selfie countless times or add however many filters to your smartphone’s gazillion megapixel photo just to make sure it looks perfect before uploading it to your favourite online social web site. Back in the olde times it was a little more difficult.

Before this fantastic era of digital you didn’t have a screen to make sure everything was in shot and you couldn’t go back to delete any rubbish photos. You had 24 or 36 shots on a film, which then took hours to process, just to find out if you managed to get the perfect photo of Baby Brind before he dropped his ice cream. Unless you really know what you’re doing, shooting with film can be a whole lot more of a gamble.

During last years ATBA-UK Freestyle Session at Hales Superbole I decided to take the gamble and try shooting on my ‘old skool’ Olympus Trip 35; a camera which looks more Hipster than the Bugs Boarding tie dye jerseys.

The camera is at least 32 years old and produced some pretty cool effects with a natural Instagram-filter-like glow. I only had the one film to play with so trying to decide when to put the digital camera down and pick up the film camera was difficult, but this only added to the excitement of finding out what worked and what didn’t…

 

 

Although some of the pictures wouldn’t usually make it into one of my digital galleries, it was a whole lot of fun trying it out and I’ll definitely give it a go again.

If you’re into your photography I’d always recommend giving it a go, it really sends you back to the basics so you don’t rely on digital wizardry.

You can also get your films processed onto a cd so you can still share them on your favourite online social web site. Think of it as a ‘not-so-insta-instagram’. Still could be worth sticking to digital for the important shots though!

 

24A_0054The highly important mountainboard feet shot

Riders include Matt Brind, Andy Brind, Jess Thomas and more.

Words & Pictures by Andy Rolfe.